data exploration in the Cream City

We need to stop building bad places. We don’t need to build Rome or Paris. We just need to stop building Houston.
— Eight Steps To Improve Urbanism | Streets MN, 7/26/2014 (via atlurbanist)

(via thisbigcity)

Source: atlurbanist
(via The Meh Recovery « The Dish)
Source: dish.andrewsullivan.com
thisiscitylab:

The blog that mines NYC’s massive data clearinghouse to visualize issues facing city dwellers, from education to eating.

Here in Milwaukee, we have “massive data clearinghouse” envy.

thisiscitylab:

The blog that mines NYC’s massive data clearinghouse to visualize issues facing city dwellers, from education to eating.

Here in Milwaukee, we have “massive data clearinghouse” envy.

Source: thisiscitylab
milwaukier-than-thou:

paul druecke at the lynden sculpture garden

milwaukier-than-thou:

paul druecke at the lynden sculpture garden

Source: milwaukier-than-thou
milwaukier-than-thou:

archie of archie’s Press recently came to our city, researched furiously, & produced this remarkable map. it is, for so many reasons, an account of milwaukee that i love. i am endlessly thrilled to own this (just picked up its custom frame at tradewinds today).http://etsy.me/1pOQQRW

Not a fan. I like some of archie’s other maps – Portland and New Orleans are cool – but I’m afraid that this one simply reduces Milwaukee to a rather boring grid of lines and circles. The emphasis of certain neighborhoods over others is puzzling. Makes me wonder about the nature of the furious research.
@tofias’ take. I do wish I had some extra time.

milwaukier-than-thou:

archie of archie’s Press recently came to our city, researched furiously, & produced this remarkable map. it is, for so many reasons, an account of milwaukee that i love. i am endlessly thrilled to own this (just picked up its custom frame at tradewinds today).

http://etsy.me/1pOQQRW

Not a fan. I like some of archie’s other maps – Portland and New Orleans are cool – but I’m afraid that this one simply reduces Milwaukee to a rather boring grid of lines and circles. The emphasis of certain neighborhoods over others is puzzling. Makes me wonder about the nature of the furious research.

@tofias’ take. I do wish I had some extra time.

Source: milwaukier-than-thou
Mayfly swarm on radar - a gross phenomenon.
I worked as a waiter at a riverside restaurant one summer in La Crosse. To open the restaurant during this time of year, I remember having to shake mayfly carcasses out of the patio umbrellas and *shovel* them off the deck.
(Image and story at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Mayfly swarm on radar - a gross phenomenon.

I worked as a waiter at a riverside restaurant one summer in La Crosse. To open the restaurant during this time of year, I remember having to shake mayfly carcasses out of the patio umbrellas and *shovel* them off the deck.

(Image and story at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Source: jsonline.com
Hey Wisconsonites: 
I know they’re fun, but try not to fly your drones in these red areas.
(looking at you @kenkofoto)

Hey Wisconsonites: 

I know they’re fun, but try not to fly your drones in these red areas.

(looking at you @kenkofoto)

thisiscitylab:

A lovely animation of the planet’s hot-weather “misery.”
[Image: Cameron Beccario]
Source: thisiscitylab
visicert:

jai—me:

Dredge City: sediment catalysis
Matthew D Moffitt Student ASLA, Undergraduate, Pennsylvania State University

visicert:

jai—me:

Dredge City: sediment catalysis

Matthew D Moffitt Student ASLAUndergraduate, Pennsylvania State University

(via alphatree)

Source: jai--me
vizual-statistix:

Religious buildings (churches, mosques, synagogues, temples, and other places of worship) often have an intentional orientation, largely to assist with fixing the direction people face when praying. The altar in Christian churches is often pointed toward the liturgical east. Islamic mosques are traditionally oriented toward the Qibla (direction of Mecca).
For these calculations, I selected five countries that are dominated by five different religions (Thailand – Buddhism; Italy – Catholicism; Israel – Judaism; Pakistan – Islam; India – Hinduism). The shapefile containing the Israel buildings was merged with Palestine, which is predominantly Islamic. Though these could be separated, the exact border between the two countries is a bit tenuous, so I opted to leave it as a single region.
The method for the calculation is shown on the graphic. For each building footprint, a bounding rectangle is defined. This rectangle is oriented to minimize its width. The orientation of the building is then measured as the azimuth of the rectangle’s height (longer sides). Orientation is counted in both directions, so a building facing due east is also considered to face west. The plots show the frequency of a given orientation in 5° bins.
As you can see, most religious buildings in these countries are aligned east-west. Pakistan is slightly north of east from Mecca, which may explain why many of the religious buildings there are orientated WSW-ENE.
Data source: http://download.geofabrik.de/

vizual-statistix:

Religious buildings (churches, mosques, synagogues, temples, and other places of worship) often have an intentional orientation, largely to assist with fixing the direction people face when praying. The altar in Christian churches is often pointed toward the liturgical east. Islamic mosques are traditionally oriented toward the Qibla (direction of Mecca).

For these calculations, I selected five countries that are dominated by five different religions (Thailand – Buddhism; Italy – Catholicism; Israel – Judaism; Pakistan – Islam; India – Hinduism). The shapefile containing the Israel buildings was merged with Palestine, which is predominantly Islamic. Though these could be separated, the exact border between the two countries is a bit tenuous, so I opted to leave it as a single region.

The method for the calculation is shown on the graphic. For each building footprint, a bounding rectangle is defined. This rectangle is oriented to minimize its width. The orientation of the building is then measured as the azimuth of the rectangle’s height (longer sides). Orientation is counted in both directions, so a building facing due east is also considered to face west. The plots show the frequency of a given orientation in 5° bins.

As you can see, most religious buildings in these countries are aligned east-west. Pakistan is slightly north of east from Mecca, which may explain why many of the religious buildings there are orientated WSW-ENE.

Data source: http://download.geofabrik.de/

Source: vizual-statistix
Forget Uber and Lyft for a second, here are the routes where people run in Milwaukee.
Note the concentrated intensity of use along the Oak Leaf, the Hank Aaron, and other trails. Now imagine what this map might look like if Wisconsin invested more in bike and pedestrian infrastructure instead of widening highways.

Forget Uber and Lyft for a second, here are the routes where people run in Milwaukee.

Note the concentrated intensity of use along the Oak Leaf, the Hank Aaron, and other trails. Now imagine what this map might look like if Wisconsin invested more in bike and pedestrian infrastructure instead of widening highways.

notemily:


When the new Capitol Drive bridge was planned (it replaced a rickety wood-plank contraption so narrow there was scarcely room for two vehicles to pass), the city of Milwaukee asked Shorewood to share in the cost. The village categorically refused, pointing to its charter, which set the community’s boundary at the water’s edge and included no part of the river itself.
To Shorewood’s dismay, Milwaukee would remember this nifty piece of historical trivia and turn it against the village four years later.

How the 1927 Capitol Drive bridge saved part of the Milwaukee River

notemily:

When the new Capitol Drive bridge was planned (it replaced a rickety wood-plank contraption so narrow there was scarcely room for two vehicles to pass), the city of Milwaukee asked Shorewood to share in the cost. The village categorically refused, pointing to its charter, which set the community’s boundary at the water’s edge and included no part of the river itself.

To Shorewood’s dismay, Milwaukee would remember this nifty piece of historical trivia and turn it against the village four years later.

How the 1927 Capitol Drive bridge saved part of the Milwaukee River

(via onmilwaukee)

Source: milwaukeenotebook.wordpress.com
City crews resurfaced and painted Humboldt Blvd just in time for Riverwest 24. This stretch of the circuit will be like butter. 

(Photo of a bike lane road stencil at Humboldt and Wright today. )

City crews resurfaced and painted Humboldt Blvd just in time for Riverwest 24. This stretch of the circuit will be like butter.

(Photo of a bike lane road stencil at Humboldt and Wright today. )

(via The Schools Where Apple, Google, and Facebook Get Their Recruits | Design | WIRED)
Source: Wired