data exploration in the Cream City

datarep:

Does anyone know why there is a peak in the number of Google searches for “1990s” in May of almost every year?

datarep:

Does anyone know why there is a peak in the number of Google searches for “1990s” in May of almost every year?

Source: datarep
thisbigcity:

atlurbanist:

I’ll take this a step further and say that if you have a significant number of these unsafe streets, you designed the entirety of your urban place wrong. How did we end up with so many of these strange, car-dependent things called “arterial roads” adjacent to homes and businesses? That’s a 20th-century placemaking fail of epic proportions.
Fred Kent, founder of Project for Public Spaces, has a great quote:

“If you plan cities for cars and traffic, you get cars and traffic. If you plan for people and places, you get people and places.”

If you’re interested in hearing from a guy who knows a lot about the origin of sprawling, car-centric places, I recommend heading to Atlanta’s Manuel’s Tavern this Thursday night where author Ben Ross will be speaking.
Above graphic from Strong Towns

Truth.

thisbigcity:

atlurbanist:

I’ll take this a step further and say that if you have a significant number of these unsafe streets, you designed the entirety of your urban place wrong. How did we end up with so many of these strange, car-dependent things called “arterial roads” adjacent to homes and businesses? That’s a 20th-century placemaking fail of epic proportions.

Fred Kent, founder of Project for Public Spaces, has a great quote:

“If you plan cities for cars and traffic, you get cars and traffic. If you plan for people and places, you get people and places.”

If you’re interested in hearing from a guy who knows a lot about the origin of sprawling, car-centric places, I recommend heading to Atlanta’s Manuel’s Tavern this Thursday night where author Ben Ross will be speaking.

Above graphic from Strong Towns

Truth.

Source: atlurbanist
mapsontheweb:

Zooming in on the Great Lakes

mapsontheweb:

Zooming in on the Great Lakes

Source: epa.gov
Nice slope graph.
datarep:

The overweight and obese, selected countries
Read More

Nice slope graph.

datarep:

The overweight and obese, selected countries

Read More

Source: datarep
Most programming doesn’t require a special brain, but it’s more frustrating and messier than anyone lets on. There are thousands of enthusiastic blog posts, classes and apps that aim to entice you with the promise of a slick, unequivocal procedure for learning to code. They rarely mention the tedium of getting your environment set up (which, trust me, even the nicest of your programmer friends don’t want to help you with, because that stuff is mad frustrating and nobody remembers how they did it).
…They don’t tell you that a lot of programming skill is about developing a knack for asking the right questions on Google and knowing which code is best to copy-paste. And they don’t let you in on a big secret: that there is no mastery, there is no final level. The anxiety of feeling lost and stupid is not something you learn to conquer, but something you learn to live with.
— Kate Ray, Technical Cofounder, Scroll Kit. TechCrunch, Don’t Believe Anyone Who Tells You Learning To Code Is Easy (via we-are-star-stuff)

(via littletinyfish)

Source: futurejournalismproject
vizual-statistix:

When it comes to making data visually engaging, sometimes nature does the work for you. That’s the case with these scatter plots, which simply show how attributes of solar eclipses vary as a function of latitude. The data come from the supplementary material for “Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000” (NASA/TP-2009-214174), which includes 11,898 past and future solar eclipses. Similar to my Earth’s spinning speed graphic, I’ve plotted latitude on the y-axis for geographic purposes, even though it should be thought of as the independent variable in most of the graphs.
I’ve defined some of the terms on the graphic to help with the interpretation. If you aren’t familiar with the concepts, check out the second data source, which is a good resource for understanding solar eclipses. 
Data sources: 
Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak (NASA’s GSFC) 
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEpubs/5MKSE.html

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/solar.html

vizual-statistix:

When it comes to making data visually engaging, sometimes nature does the work for you. That’s the case with these scatter plots, which simply show how attributes of solar eclipses vary as a function of latitude. The data come from the supplementary material for “Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000” (NASA/TP-2009-214174), which includes 11,898 past and future solar eclipses. Similar to my Earth’s spinning speed graphic, I’ve plotted latitude on the y-axis for geographic purposes, even though it should be thought of as the independent variable in most of the graphs.

I’ve defined some of the terms on the graphic to help with the interpretation. If you aren’t familiar with the concepts, check out the second data source, which is a good resource for understanding solar eclipses.

Data sources:

Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak (NASA’s GSFC)

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEpubs/5MKSE.html

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/solar.html

Source: vizual-statistix
My favorite Lake Michigan dreamer.

My favorite Lake Michigan dreamer.

Source: dujoducom
Says the creator of Breathing City:

See, it is super easy and takes almost no time at all to create something like this, as long as your definitions of “super easy” and “no time” are flexible enough to include difficult and time-consuming.

(more)

Says the creator of Breathing City:

See, it is super easy and takes almost no time at all to create something like this, as long as your definitions of “super easy” and “no time” are flexible enough to include difficult and time-consuming.

(more)

(via mapsnshit)

Source: darkhorseanalytics.com
Nathan Yau explains:

This is fun. Tyler Vigen wrote a program that attempts to automatically find things that correlate. As of writing this, 4,000 correlations were found so far (and actually over 100 more when I finished).

Nathan Yau explains:

This is fun. Tyler Vigen wrote a program that attempts to automatically find things that correlate. As of writing this, 4,000 correlations were found so far (and actually over 100 more when I finished).

3

Number of times this week I have been subjected to Game of Thrones analogies in conversations about data.

It’s only Wednesday.

ilovecharts:

Changing Costs For Americans
Source: plot.ly
The greater Milwaukee area, as categorized by ESRI.
Where do you live? In the “High Society” suburbs?
Perhaps in a “Senior Styles” or “High Hopes” area?
Did you know that "Scholars and Patriots" live in Riverwest and the East Side? 
Try not to confuse the “Family Portrait” turf with the “Solo Acts” turf – or you could get into serious trouble.
Ridiculous. The greater Milwaukee area, as categorized by ESRI.
Where do you live? In the “High Society” suburbs?
Perhaps in a “Senior Styles” or “High Hopes” area?
Did you know that "Scholars and Patriots" live in Riverwest and the East Side? 
Try not to confuse the “Family Portrait” turf with the “Solo Acts” turf – or you could get into serious trouble.
Ridiculous.

The greater Milwaukee area, as categorized by ESRI.

Where do you live? In the “High Society” suburbs?

Perhaps in a “Senior Styles” or “High Hopes” area?

Did you know that "Scholars and Patriots" live in Riverwest and the East Side?

Try not to confuse the “Family Portrait” turf with the “Solo Acts” turf – or you could get into serious trouble.

Ridiculous.

Having a lean budget is a sorry excuse for not understanding and presenting data well. With rise of open source software and open data, this is especially true for non-profits that need to analyze and share their spatial data.
(Above: a bunch of Milwaukee non-profit innovators and I at a recent web map training sponsored by IMPACT Planning Council.)

Having a lean budget is a sorry excuse for not understanding and presenting data well. With rise of open source software and open data, this is especially true for non-profits that need to analyze and share their spatial data.

(Above: a bunch of Milwaukee non-profit innovators and I at a recent web map training sponsored by IMPACT Planning Council.)

Eric and Ken
Snapshot of my Tumblr dash the other day. Remarkable.
(via @kenkofoto and @shootingjohngunn)

Eric and Ken

Snapshot of my Tumblr dash the other day. Remarkable.

(via @kenkofoto and @shootingjohngunn)