theatlanticcities:

48 madcap hours in the life of Citi Bike.

Source: theatlanticcities

Lame

Please, no more stupid fake news stories. No more sly, pretend feature roll-outs. The funny is dead. You killed it.

sunlightcities:

Don’t attribute open data; cite it! 
The desire to describe data provenance should not involve a legal requirement that will hinder the freest use of that data. By identifying the best form of citation for their data, government data managers position themselves in a helpful way, demonstrating themselves to be experts on and guides to their data. The best role government can take in the opening of its data is to ensure that it enables the best possible quality of research. It is a far superior role to jealously and inappropriately claiming legal ownership rights to our public data.

sunlightcities:

Don’t attribute open data; cite it! 

The desire to describe data provenance should not involve a legal requirement that will hinder the freest use of that data. By identifying the best form of citation for their data, government data managers position themselves in a helpful way, demonstrating themselves to be experts on and guides to their data. The best role government can take in the opening of its data is to ensure that it enables the best possible quality of research. It is a far superior role to jealously and inappropriately claiming legal ownership rights to our public data.

Source: sunlightcities
In the past, data-laziness was probably more of a threat to humanity. Since systematic data was scarce, people had a tendency to sit around and daydream about how stuff might work. But now that Big Data is getting bigger and computing power is cheap, theory-laziness seems to be becoming more of a menace. The lure of Big Data is that we can get all our ideas from mining for patterns, but A) we get a lot of false patterns that way, and B) the patterns insidiously and subtly suggest interpretations for themselves, and those interpretations are often wrong.
— Noah Smith (via tofias)
Source: tofias
Space Station Milwaukee
Eleanor Lutz styled a lovely Mapbox theme that makes your favorite city look like it’s orbiting in space. She describes her inspiration:

I’m a big fan of science fiction and computer games, so I couldn’t resist making a space themed map this month. I crammed it full of bright lights and chrome like some of my favorite post-apocalyptic worlds: the Matrix, Battlestar Galactica, and Starcraft.

Right on.

Space Station Milwaukee

Eleanor Lutz styled a lovely Mapbox theme that makes your favorite city look like it’s orbiting in space. She describes her inspiration:

I’m a big fan of science fiction and computer games, so I couldn’t resist making a space themed map this month. I crammed it full of bright lights and chrome like some of my favorite post-apocalyptic worlds: the Matrix, Battlestar Galactica, and Starcraft.

Right on.

Source: mapbox.com
Milwaukee is the only major American city to have ever elected three socialist mayors.
— Alice Cooper, John Gurda’s alter ego.
Source: youtube.com
"This is the kind of smallpox we are having." 
Milwaukee was ravaged by multiple smallpox outbreaks in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, leading to the construction of a large public hospital and quarantine complex on the city’s south side. The effects of a particularly deadly epidemic in 1925 were graphed by Dr. Merle R. French – suggesting a mortality rate in the 20% to 30% range.

Dr. French wrote a note describing the patient pictured here: “Picture of smallpox patient taken at S.view Hospital a short time ago. Man was a Christian Scientist who thought that he could by power of mind prevent smallpox. Man died. This is the kind of smallpox we are having.” 

(images and excerpt via Smallpox in Milwaukee, 1925 — History of Vaccines)
By the way, have you seen this Milwaukee history blog: CITIZN65? Definitely have a look – there’s some well-researched posts on Milwaukee’s first House of Corrections and how an old cannon forged in Seville, Spain ended up in Milwaukee. "This is the kind of smallpox we are having." 
Milwaukee was ravaged by multiple smallpox outbreaks in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, leading to the construction of a large public hospital and quarantine complex on the city’s south side. The effects of a particularly deadly epidemic in 1925 were graphed by Dr. Merle R. French – suggesting a mortality rate in the 20% to 30% range.

Dr. French wrote a note describing the patient pictured here: “Picture of smallpox patient taken at S.view Hospital a short time ago. Man was a Christian Scientist who thought that he could by power of mind prevent smallpox. Man died. This is the kind of smallpox we are having.” 

(images and excerpt via Smallpox in Milwaukee, 1925 — History of Vaccines)
By the way, have you seen this Milwaukee history blog: CITIZN65? Definitely have a look – there’s some well-researched posts on Milwaukee’s first House of Corrections and how an old cannon forged in Seville, Spain ended up in Milwaukee.

"This is the kind of smallpox we are having." 

Milwaukee was ravaged by multiple smallpox outbreaks in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, leading to the construction of a large public hospital and quarantine complex on the city’s south side. The effects of a particularly deadly epidemic in 1925 were graphed by Dr. Merle R. French – suggesting a mortality rate in the 20% to 30% range.

Dr. French wrote a note describing the patient pictured here: “Picture of smallpox patient taken at S.view Hospital a short time ago. Man was a Christian Scientist who thought that he could by power of mind prevent smallpox. Man died. This is the kind of smallpox we are having.” 

(images and excerpt via Smallpox in Milwaukee, 1925 — History of Vaccines)

By the way, have you seen this Milwaukee history blog: CITIZN65? Definitely have a look – there’s some well-researched posts on Milwaukee’s first House of Corrections and how an old cannon forged in Seville, Spain ended up in Milwaukee.

Source: historyofvaccines.org
The West is great. But seriously, I suspect gross bias in this methodology. Show me the data please.
mapsnshit:

mapsontheweb:

US counties, by most desirable living environment

Go west young man

The West is great. But seriously, I suspect gross bias in this methodology. Show me the data please.

mapsnshit:

mapsontheweb:

US counties, by most desirable living environment

Go west young man

Source: ispol.com
My favorite thing about this interactive chart: it IS NOT shaped like a pizza pie.
NPR’s Planet Money:

The math of why bigger pizzas are such a good deal is simple: A pizza is a circle, and the area of a circle increases with the square of the radius. So, for example, a 16-inch pizza is actually four times as big as an 8-inch pizza. And when you look at thousands of pizza prices from around the U.S., you see that you almost always get a much, much better deal when you buy a bigger pizza.

(h/t The Dish)

My favorite thing about this interactive chart: it IS NOT shaped like a pizza pie.

NPR’s Planet Money:

The math of why bigger pizzas are such a good deal is simple: A pizza is a circle, and the area of a circle increases with the square of the radius. So, for example, a 16-inch pizza is actually four times as big as an 8-inch pizza. And when you look at thousands of pizza prices from around the U.S., you see that you almost always get a much, much better deal when you buy a bigger pizza.

(h/t The Dish)

datarep:

Why we walk in cities: a map of how far one mile can take a pedestrian in an American city vs. an American suburb

datarep:

Why we walk in cities: a map of how far one mile can take a pedestrian in an American city vs. an American suburb

(via mapsnshit)

Source: datarep
milwaukier-than-thou:

milwaukier-than-thou:

The Real Estate of the City
To love a place is to accept it for all that it is.
Foreclosure/vacancy/neglect in Milwaukee grows at a troubling rate. As we search for clarity and solutions, numbers cannot communicate the impact. The magnitude is so large, it can be confusing — it can be paralyzing. But the problem belongs to us all. Milwaukee’s foreclosure/vacancy/neglect can create an anger and frustration full of important information — an impulse to learn. To act.
The Real Estate of the City is 1200 nails, each representing a foreclosed home, pounded into its location on a map of Milwaukee. The project was presented at the State of the City address on the morning of 2/25/2013 in the Pritzlaff Building. It was executed by a small group of people who conceived of the idea less than a week ago and is the first in a series of projects attempting to visualize and untangle the scale/scope of foreclosure/vacancy/neglect in the city. It is a simple gesture using available resources to engage with a complex problem.
To love Milwaukee is to accept it for all that it is.

did this a year ago with keith hayes and sarah luther
milwaukier-than-thou:

milwaukier-than-thou:

The Real Estate of the City
To love a place is to accept it for all that it is.
Foreclosure/vacancy/neglect in Milwaukee grows at a troubling rate. As we search for clarity and solutions, numbers cannot communicate the impact. The magnitude is so large, it can be confusing — it can be paralyzing. But the problem belongs to us all. Milwaukee’s foreclosure/vacancy/neglect can create an anger and frustration full of important information — an impulse to learn. To act.
The Real Estate of the City is 1200 nails, each representing a foreclosed home, pounded into its location on a map of Milwaukee. The project was presented at the State of the City address on the morning of 2/25/2013 in the Pritzlaff Building. It was executed by a small group of people who conceived of the idea less than a week ago and is the first in a series of projects attempting to visualize and untangle the scale/scope of foreclosure/vacancy/neglect in the city. It is a simple gesture using available resources to engage with a complex problem.
To love Milwaukee is to accept it for all that it is.

did this a year ago with keith hayes and sarah luther

milwaukier-than-thou:

milwaukier-than-thou:

The Real Estate of the City

To love a place is to accept it for all that it is.

Foreclosure/vacancy/neglect in Milwaukee grows at a troubling rate. As we search for clarity and solutions, numbers cannot communicate the impact. The magnitude is so large, it can be confusing — it can be paralyzing. But the problem belongs to us all. Milwaukee’s foreclosure/vacancy/neglect can create an anger and frustration full of important information — an impulse to learn. To act.

The Real Estate of the City is 1200 nails, each representing a foreclosed home, pounded into its location on a map of Milwaukee. The project was presented at the State of the City address on the morning of 2/25/2013 in the Pritzlaff Building. It was executed by a small group of people who conceived of the idea less than a week ago and is the first in a series of projects attempting to visualize and untangle the scale/scope of foreclosure/vacancy/neglect in the city. It is a simple gesture using available resources to engage with a complex problem.

To love Milwaukee is to accept it for all that it is.

did this a year ago with keith hayes and sarah luther

Source: milwaukier-than-thou
Once, Midwestern schools pumped educated students into the big industrial economy that supported the region’s middle class until its pensions kicked in and the health care sector took over. The schools and the hospitals are still there, for the young and old, but the industrial link between them, like that middle class itself, has gone away.
Source: globalmidwest.typepad.com
sunlightcities:

The Philadelphia Police Department‘s website now features an interactive crime map made by developer Dave Walk … 
"It’s notable that a city agency is using an app built by a hobby project for a few reasons. For one, it’s placing a civic hacker project on a very public-facing website. It’s also a very tangible example of how the City of Philadelphia is benefiting from an open data release, but it also suggests a dedication to transparency. Not only will we offer up our data, the city is saying, but we’ll make it easy for you to look at and use.” 
Read more about this awesomeness on Technical.ly Philly 

sunlightcities:

The Philadelphia Police Department‘s website now features an interactive crime map made by developer Dave Walk … 

"It’s notable that a city agency is using an app built by a hobby project for a few reasons. For one, it’s placing a civic hacker project on a very public-facing website. It’s also a very tangible example of how the City of Philadelphia is benefiting from an open data release, but it also suggests a dedication to transparency. Not only will we offer up our data, the city is saying, but we’ll make it easy for you to look at and use.” 

Read more about this awesomeness on Technical.ly Philly 

Source: sunlightcities
Nice.
But the real problem with challenging parking tickets in Milwaukee –and probably many other cities– is the requirement to do so in person before a municipal judge. If this app could figure its way around that 3+ hour barrier … now that would be killer.
theatlanticcities:

"What I always tell people is that the parking regulations aren’t black-and-white," says Hegarty, the co-creator of a shrewd new app that aims to help users wrangle out of parking tickets (seemingly unjust parking tickets, that is). “There’s not like a manual in City Hall that says ‘these are the parking violations.’ Ordinances get passed, statutes get passed.” Regulations pile up on top of each other. They come down from the city and the state. “It’s actually ferociously complicated. Each ordinance has 30 to 40 lines of fine print, written in non-clear legalese.”
The app – simply called Fixed – navigates all that fine print for you, with the help of legal researchers (mostly law students on contract). It’s so far in beta in San Francisco with fewer than 1,000 users. Hegarty and co-creators David Sanghera and DJ Burdick are hoping to have it in the iPhone app store by the end of the month, where it will gradually become available to a wait list of some 25,000 San Franciscans. From there, Fixed is angling to move to other cities, where the idea at its core – leveraging technology to lower the burden of accessing laws and interacting with government – will test public agencies that field these appeals.
Cities, after all, love this kind of innovation when it helps small businesses to apply for a permit, or neighbors to plan a block party. But when it helps drivers outsmart their parking citations?
The app works like this: Users snap a photo of their parking ticket. Based on the type of citation (street cleaning, expired meter, etc.), the app responds with several suggested errors commonly associated with the violation. Was the street cleaning sign visible? Did the parking officer record your VIN number correctly? Was the meter broken? Based on the answers, the app prompts users to collect additional photographic evidence from the scene. Then it compiles a letter contesting the citation. Users digitally sign the document, and Fixed (snail)mails it to the city on their behalf.
Continue reading “How To Get Out of Parking Tickets”

Nice.

But the real problem with challenging parking tickets in Milwaukee –and probably many other cities– is the requirement to do so in person before a municipal judge. If this app could figure its way around that 3+ hour barrier … now that would be killer.

theatlanticcities:

"What I always tell people is that the parking regulations aren’t black-and-white," says Hegarty, the co-creator of a shrewd new app that aims to help users wrangle out of parking tickets (seemingly unjust parking tickets, that is). “There’s not like a manual in City Hall that says ‘these are the parking violations.’ Ordinances get passed, statutes get passed.” Regulations pile up on top of each other. They come down from the city and the state. “It’s actually ferociously complicated. Each ordinance has 30 to 40 lines of fine print, written in non-clear legalese.”

The app – simply called Fixed – navigates all that fine print for you, with the help of legal researchers (mostly law students on contract). It’s so far in beta in San Francisco with fewer than 1,000 users. Hegarty and co-creators David Sanghera and DJ Burdick are hoping to have it in the iPhone app store by the end of the month, where it will gradually become available to a wait list of some 25,000 San Franciscans. From there, Fixed is angling to move to other cities, where the idea at its core – leveraging technology to lower the burden of accessing laws and interacting with government – will test public agencies that field these appeals.

Cities, after all, love this kind of innovation when it helps small businesses to apply for a permit, or neighbors to plan a block party. But when it helps drivers outsmart their parking citations?

The app works like this: Users snap a photo of their parking ticket. Based on the type of citation (street cleaning, expired meter, etc.), the app responds with several suggested errors commonly associated with the violation. Was the street cleaning sign visible? Did the parking officer record your VIN number correctly? Was the meter broken? Based on the answers, the app prompts users to collect additional photographic evidence from the scene. Then it compiles a letter contesting the citation. Users digitally sign the document, and Fixed (snail)mails it to the city on their behalf.

Continue reading “How To Get Out of Parking Tickets

Source: theatlanticcities