Milwaukee is Closing the Migration Gap
IRS data show that Milwaukee County is experiencing a net loss in migration, but the this gap has been steadily closing over the five most recent years measured. This data visualization courtesy of Forbes is nice. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to dig into the underlying data. Thus, I can’t tell you precisely what Milwaukee County’s net migration loss was in any year. Or how much the gap has closed during this period. Nevertheless, the consistent decline in the migration gap is encouraging news for Milwaukee.
Looking at the nationwide map, one notices the following significant migration flows in 2009:  Key origins of Milwaukee immigrants:
Michigan
Southern California 
Contra Costa Co (San Francisco Bay area) 
Marion County, Ind. (Indianapolis) 
Phoenix
Key destinations of Milwaukee emigrants:
Chicago (Cook County)
Florida
Texas
Atlanta
Seattle area
San Jose, CA
DC area
Perhaps the most interesting thing revealed by these data are the migration patterns happening WITHIN Wisconsin. (I’ll cover that in a subsequent post.) Milwaukee is Closing the Migration Gap
IRS data show that Milwaukee County is experiencing a net loss in migration, but the this gap has been steadily closing over the five most recent years measured. This data visualization courtesy of Forbes is nice. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to dig into the underlying data. Thus, I can’t tell you precisely what Milwaukee County’s net migration loss was in any year. Or how much the gap has closed during this period. Nevertheless, the consistent decline in the migration gap is encouraging news for Milwaukee.
Looking at the nationwide map, one notices the following significant migration flows in 2009:  Key origins of Milwaukee immigrants:
Michigan
Southern California 
Contra Costa Co (San Francisco Bay area) 
Marion County, Ind. (Indianapolis) 
Phoenix
Key destinations of Milwaukee emigrants:
Chicago (Cook County)
Florida
Texas
Atlanta
Seattle area
San Jose, CA
DC area
Perhaps the most interesting thing revealed by these data are the migration patterns happening WITHIN Wisconsin. (I’ll cover that in a subsequent post.)

Milwaukee is Closing the Migration Gap

IRS data show that Milwaukee County is experiencing a net loss in migration, but the this gap has been steadily closing over the five most recent years measured. This data visualization courtesy of Forbes is nice. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to dig into the underlying data. Thus, I can’t tell you precisely what Milwaukee County’s net migration loss was in any year. Or how much the gap has closed during this period. Nevertheless, the consistent decline in the migration gap is encouraging news for Milwaukee.

Looking at the nationwide map, one notices the following significant migration flows in 2009: Key origins of Milwaukee immigrants:

  • Michigan
  • Southern California
  • Contra Costa Co (San Francisco Bay area)
  • Marion County, Ind. (Indianapolis)
  • Phoenix

Key destinations of Milwaukee emigrants:

  • Chicago (Cook County)
  • Florida
  • Texas
  • Atlanta
  • Seattle area
  • San Jose, CA
  • DC area

Perhaps the most interesting thing revealed by these data are the migration patterns happening WITHIN Wisconsin. (I’ll cover that in a subsequent post.)

Source: forbes.com

13 notes

  1. milwaukeestat posted this