data exploration in the Cream City

Mayfly swarm on radar - a gross phenomenon.
I worked as a waiter at a riverside restaurant one summer in La Crosse. To open the restaurant during this time of year, I remember having to shake mayfly carcasses out of the patio umbrellas and *shovel* them off the deck.
(Image and story at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Mayfly swarm on radar - a gross phenomenon.

I worked as a waiter at a riverside restaurant one summer in La Crosse. To open the restaurant during this time of year, I remember having to shake mayfly carcasses out of the patio umbrellas and *shovel* them off the deck.

(Image and story at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Source: jsonline.com
Hey Wisconsonites: 
I know they’re fun, but try not to fly your drones in these red areas.
(looking at you @kenkofoto)

Hey Wisconsonites: 

I know they’re fun, but try not to fly your drones in these red areas.

(looking at you @kenkofoto)

mke-ephemera:

'Nike Missile Bases' map - Circa 1950
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
This map shows the eight missile base locations in Milwaukee and the surrounding areas around 1950. If you’ve never heard of Maitland Field, you’ve probably walked on it while listening to one of your favorite bands. Today, its known simply as the Henry W. Maier Summerfest Grounds.

When River Hills, Wisconsin had its very own Nike missile base.

mke-ephemera:

'Nike Missile Bases' map - Circa 1950

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

This map shows the eight missile base locations in Milwaukee and the surrounding areas around 1950. If you’ve never heard of Maitland Field, you’ve probably walked on it while listening to one of your favorite bands. Today, its known simply as the Henry W. Maier Summerfest Grounds.

When River Hills, Wisconsin had its very own Nike missile base.

Source: mke-ephemera
I can’t help it. Almost every time I work on a new map, I just get caught up in the simple beauty of simple things. Here, for example, are all the non-residential roads in Wisconsin.

Thanks OpenStreetMap contributors.

I can’t help it. Almost every time I work on a new map, I just get caught up in the simple beauty of simple things. Here, for example, are all the non-residential roads in Wisconsin.

Thanks OpenStreetMap contributors.

sunlightcities:

Friday city fun: which park are you closest to? 

Cool. But there are also 10 National Seashores and Lakeshores that are operated by the National Park Service. These should be included.

For example, the inclusion of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (you know, with the incredible ice caves everyone was talking about this Winter) would make this map more meaningful for us Wisconsonites.

sunlightcities:

Friday city fun: which park are you closest to? 

Cool. But there are also 10 National Seashores and Lakeshores that are operated by the National Park Service. These should be included.

For example, the inclusion of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (you know, with the incredible ice caves everyone was talking about this Winter) would make this map more meaningful for us Wisconsonites.

Source: twitter.com
7.5% of Wisconsin uses ”an unsupported operating system to access the Internet.” This says a lot about Wisconsin. IMHO, it’s a good indicator of the cultural challenge we face in growing high tech sectors. Just compare to Minnesota - at 5.45%. Enough said.
mapsontheweb:

Windows XP usage in USA

7.5% of Wisconsin uses ”an unsupported operating system to access the Internet.” This says a lot about Wisconsin. IMHO, it’s a good indicator of the cultural challenge we face in growing high tech sectors. Just compare to Minnesota - at 5.45%. Enough said.

mapsontheweb:

Windows XP usage in USA

Source: webpagefx.com
Wisconsin’s largest metros are surprisingly dense
New Smart Growth America report determines that Milwaukee and Madison top the charts in terms of density and work-home connections.
Milwaukee is one of the most “compact and connected” large metros in the U.S
Madison is the most “compact and connected” medium-sized metro.
(h/t The Dish) Wisconsin’s largest metros are surprisingly dense
New Smart Growth America report determines that Milwaukee and Madison top the charts in terms of density and work-home connections.
Milwaukee is one of the most “compact and connected” large metros in the U.S
Madison is the most “compact and connected” medium-sized metro.
(h/t The Dish)

Wisconsin’s largest metros are surprisingly dense

New Smart Growth America report determines that Milwaukee and Madison top the charts in terms of density and work-home connections.

  • Milwaukee is one of the most “compact and connected” large metros in the U.S
  • Madison is the most “compact and connected” medium-sized metro.

(h/t The Dish)

Local roads are the backbone of an efficient statewide transportation system and Wisconsin’s economy. It doesn’t do us any good to spend… billions of dollars on on highway projects if people can’t get to the highways without going through pothole after pothole after pothole.
Source: jsonline.com
Polar Vortex?
No, this is not a meteorological map of the latest polar vortex to descend upon Milwaukee. It’s actually a ward-by-ward voting map of the 2012 presidential election in the four-county metro area. Unlike the weather and other natural phenomena, this pattern of ever intensifying political polarization hews closely to county lines.
Looking forward to reading future installments of Craig Gilbert’s Journal Sentinel series on this.
(map via Dividing Lines: A region’s huge and growing partisan schism - JSOnline)

Polar Vortex?

No, this is not a meteorological map of the latest polar vortex to descend upon Milwaukee. It’s actually a ward-by-ward voting map of the 2012 presidential election in the four-county metro area. Unlike the weather and other natural phenomena, this pattern of ever intensifying political polarization hews closely to county lines.

Looking forward to reading future installments of Craig Gilbert’s Journal Sentinel series on this.

(map via Dividing Lines: A region’s huge and growing partisan schism - JSOnline)

Source: jsonline.com
Bedtime reading … does this make me geeky, nerdy, or just boring?

This handbook … provides a brief overview of the history, evolution, and basics of Wisconsin’s coordinate reference systems, and compiles in one place the technical specifications for systems most commonly used in the state. 

Bedtime reading … does this make me geeky, nerdy, or just boring?

This handbook … provides a brief overview of the history, evolution, and basics of Wisconsin’s coordinate reference systems, and compiles in one place the technical specifications for systems most commonly used in the state. 

Source: sco.wisc.edu
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ran an AP story yesterday about an ACLU report that documented dragnet license plate surveillance programs by state and local authorities across the U.S.

For the first time, the number of license tag captures has reached the millions, according to a study published Wednesday by the American Civil Liberties Union based on information from hundreds of law enforcement agencies. Departments keep the records for weeks or years, sometimes indefinitely, saying they can be crucial in tracking suspicious cars, aiding drug busts, finding abducted children and more.
Attached to police cars, bridges or buildings and sometimes merely as an app on a police officer’s smartphone scanners capture images of passing or parked vehicles and pinpoint their locations, uploading that information into police databases.

I wish that the Journal Sentinel pursued the local angle on this. Does the Milwaukee Police Department have a similar program? What about the State – do those Department of Transportation traffic cameras also collect our license plate data?
I’m curious and would appreciate some local reporting on this. 

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ran an AP story yesterday about an ACLU report that documented dragnet license plate surveillance programs by state and local authorities across the U.S.

For the first time, the number of license tag captures has reached the millions, according to a study published Wednesday by the American Civil Liberties Union based on information from hundreds of law enforcement agencies. Departments keep the records for weeks or years, sometimes indefinitely, saying they can be crucial in tracking suspicious cars, aiding drug busts, finding abducted children and more.

Attached to police cars, bridges or buildings and sometimes merely as an app on a police officer’s smartphone scanners capture images of passing or parked vehicles and pinpoint their locations, uploading that information into police databases.

I wish that the Journal Sentinel pursued the local angle on this. Does the Milwaukee Police Department have a similar program? What about the State – do those Department of Transportation traffic cameras also collect our license plate data?

I’m curious and would appreciate some local reporting on this. 

Take that … and that!
A shameful first place for Wisconsin. More fine reporting from Urban Milwaukee’s Bruce Murphy:

No state comes close to Wisconsin in imprisoning black males. The study found that 12.8 percent, or 1 in 8 of African American working age men, were incarcerated. That rate is 32 percent higher than the second worst state, Oklahoma, and nearly double the national average of 6.7 percent (or 1 in 15).

Here’s the full report from the UW-Milwaukee Employment and Training Institute.

A shameful first place for Wisconsin. More fine reporting from Urban Milwaukee’s Bruce Murphy:

No state comes close to Wisconsin in imprisoning black males. The study found that 12.8 percent, or 1 in 8 of African American working age men, were incarcerated. That rate is 32 percent higher than the second worst state, Oklahoma, and nearly double the national average of 6.7 percent (or 1 in 15).

Here’s the full report from the UW-Milwaukee Employment and Training Institute.




The Daily Yonder notes the rural nature of those counties that flipped from (D) to (R) in the 2012 Presidential:








A large group of counties flipped from Democrat to Republican in the Upper Midwest. Twenty-six Michigan counties that voted Democratic in 2008 turned Republican in this election. Twenty-four counties in Wisconsin flipped Republican, as did 23 in Illinois and 16 in Iowa.
The map above shows all the flippers. Click on the map to see a larger version.





Yes, a preponderance of the flipped counties are in the Upper Midwest. But check out their concentration in the “North Woods” of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan. What’s that about? 


The Daily Yonder notes the rural nature of those counties that flipped from (D) to (R) in the 2012 Presidential:








A large group of counties flipped from Democrat to Republican in the Upper Midwest. Twenty-six Michigan counties that voted Democratic in 2008 turned Republican in this election. Twenty-four counties in Wisconsin flipped Republican, as did 23 in Illinois and 16 in Iowa.
The map above shows all the flippers. Click on the map to see a larger version.





Yes, a preponderance of the flipped counties are in the Upper Midwest. But check out their concentration in the “North Woods” of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan. What’s that about? 


The Daily Yonder notes the rural nature of those counties that flipped from (D) to (R) in the 2012 Presidential:








A large group of counties flipped from Democrat to Republican in the Upper Midwest. Twenty-six Michigan counties that voted Democratic in 2008 turned Republican in this election. Twenty-four counties in Wisconsin flipped Republican, as did 23 in Illinois and 16 in Iowa.
The map above shows all the flippers. Click on the map to see a larger version.





Yes, a preponderance of the flipped counties are in the Upper Midwest. But check out their concentration in the “North Woods” of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan. What’s that about?

The Daily Yonder notes the rural nature of those counties that flipped from (D) to (R) in the 2012 Presidential:

A large group of counties flipped from Democrat to Republican in the Upper Midwest. Twenty-six Michigan counties that voted Democratic in 2008 turned Republican in this election. Twenty-four counties in Wisconsin flipped Republican, as did 23 in Illinois and 16 in Iowa.

The map above shows all the flippers. Click on the map to see a larger version.

Yes, a preponderance of the flipped counties are in the Upper Midwest. But check out their concentration in the “North Woods” of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan. What’s that about?

Source: dailyyonder.com